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Ministry plans to use treated sludge for power generation

Water Ministry
(Photo: Jordan News)
AMMAN — The Ministry of Water and Irrigation and the Water Authority of Jordan (WAJ) are looking into the prospect of using treated sludge to generate electricity and will launch power projects at sewage treatment plants, Minister Mohammad Najjar said Tuesday, according to Jordan News Agency, Petra.اضافة اعلان

Najjar said that the move is part of a larger drive to use renewable energy and improve energy efficiency. The minister made the remarks at a workshop dedicated to discussing a KfW-EU-funded project designed to enhance energy efficiency and use at the Kingdom’s wastewater treatment stations.

The €69-million project, which targets 10 sewage treatment plants across the Kingdom, envisions the introduction of an aerobic sludge digestion system to produce biogas and generate energy using electric and thermo-electric generators by 2040, said Bashar Batayneh, WAJ’s secretary-general.

Germany’s KfW Development Bank will pump €49 million into the pro-ject, which will be carried out in the Ajloun, Madaba, Karak and Tafileh governorates, while the European Union will provide €20 million.

Batayneh pointed out that previously selected plants were subjected to a comprehensive evaluation and strict criteria, adding that the project will start at three plants, one west of Jerash and two in Amman, at an esti-mated cost of €44.8 million.

An economic feasibility study will be carried out, in cooperation with lo-cal and international consultants, and the necessary designs for the pro-ject will be developed according to the best international and best public safety standards to protect and develop the local environment.

The project, Batayneh said, is part of the WAJ’s and the ministry’s plans to keep abreast of the advanced, modern, environment-friendly systems, introduce alternative and renewable energy systems, enhance energy in-dependence, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, cut the cost of water and wastewater treatment, and slash operation and maintenance costs. 


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