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August 16 2022 9:38 PM ˚
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Jordan Valley farmers say heat, lack of water threatening citrus crops

Khaled Abu Alras, who is a member of the Jordanian farmer’s union and owns a plantation in Wadi Alrayyan, said his citrus crops are in their first quarter of growth and because of the heat much of his
Khaled Abu Alras, who is a member of the Jordanian farmer’s union and owns a plantation in Wadi Alrayyan, said his citrus crops are in their first quarter of growth and because of the heat much of his fruits have been burned before ripening. (Photo: Jordan News)
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AMMAN — Citrus farmers in the Jordan Valley have said that sweltering temperatures and not enough water may have an impact on their citrus harvesting season.اضافة اعلان

Khaled Abu Alras, who is a member of the Jordanian farmer’s union and owns a plantation in Wadi Alrayyan, said his citrus crops are in their first quarter of growth and because of the heat much of his fruits have been burned before ripening.

Jordan, early in the year, suffered from a subpar rainy season that only delivered around 50 percent of the rain Jordan received last year, affecting dam storage and lowering the per capita share of potable water.

Abu Alras said that he is concerned about his crops because he owns 45 citrus orchards and 1,500 dunums in Wadi Alrrayan.

Abu Alras said that he expects that 20 percent of his crops to be damaged.

Malek Alalawneh, an agricultural engineer, who owns a citrus orchard said that his trees need regular irrigation, but with the lack of water the situation has worsened. “We hope that Jordan valley authority provide us with water,” he said

However, the director of the northern Jordan Valley Agriculture Directorate Mwfaq Abusahyoon, told Jordan News, that "we will witness a good citrus season that will provide our market and export abroad,” adding that farmers must irrigate their trees regularly until the end of August.

He added that Jordan’s farmers are accustomed to the conditions in the Jordan valley, presumably meaning heat, and that the Jordan valley Authority has provided farmers with a good amount of water.

The Jordan valley produces around some 200 tonnes of produce daily from August to March.

Farmers in the northern Jordan Valley previously told Jordan News in February that they anticipated that the citrus and fruit season would be poor and that they were bracing for financial losses, due to the lack of irrigation water, and temperature fluctuations.

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