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June 30 2022 11:06 PM ˚
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Jordan hit by olive oil surplus

The pandemic and imports from Turkey and other countries caused Jordan’s olive oil exports to fall this past year, according to stakeholders. (Photo: Shutterstock)
The pandemic and imports from Turkey and other countries caused Jordan’s olive oil exports to fall this past year, according to stakeholders. (Photo: Shutterstock)
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IRBID — Each season, Jordanian families store olive oil in tanks so that they have enough for an entire year, and local demand for it is typically high as it is an indispensable ingredient in Jordanian cuisine. This year, however, the Kingdom has a surplus of 2,500 tons of olive oil.اضافة اعلان

Each year, farmers produce large quantities of olive oil to satisfy local demand and leave enough for exports.

However, last season, farmers and traders faced a sudden setback that placed olive oil exportation on hold. According to Ali Al-Masri, a farmer who owns an olive farm in Irbid, "The setback coincided with the onset of the pandemic, which led to a huge loss that we bore by offering oil at very low prices. We did not want to accumulate it in our homes."

The problem began in 2019, when weather conditions weakened the growth of the olive flower. This delayed harvest and had an impact on the quality of the olive oil being produced.


In an interview with Jordan News, Tayseer Al-Najdawi, vice president of the General Syndicate of Owners of the Press and Producers of Jordanian Olives, contended that Jordanian olive farmers are suffering.

"While a small tank of olive oil costs between 60 and 75 JDs, the farmer today is forced to sell it for a maximum price of 45 JDs,” he said.

He added that olive oil imports from Turkey, Palestine, and other countries into Jordan were the main reason behind the 2,500-ton surplus.

Musa Al-Saket, secretary of the Jordanian Association of Olive Products Exporters, told Jordan News that he sent Minister of Agriculture Khaled Al-Hanaifat solutions that may reduce olive oil quantities before next season.

According to Saket, he called the minister of agriculture to discuss the current situation and study the measures that must be taken. He also called for the establishment of a government-backed marketing company to help promote Jordanian olive oil.

"There are talks about the government's financial support for farmers," he said.


"We have been promised an abundant tourism season for this summer, and this plays an important role in restoring the spirit of the Jordanian olive oil market,” Najdawi said. “Unlike last year, Jordan will witness an influx of expatriates this year, who usually leave with olive oil tanks. This would help solve the olive oil problem we are facing.”

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