December 1 2022 10:27 PM E-paper Subscribe Sign in My Account Sign out

Poll gauges Jordanians’ opinion on a variety of issues

University admission, Tawjihi, rule of law, drugs among matters assessed

Amman
(File photo: Ameer Khalifeh/Jordan News)
AMMAN — An opinion poll conducted by the University of Jordan Center for Strategic Studies under the title “Tawjihi and the standard admission system, and current issues”, as part of the Jordanian Index poll Series, aimed to measure citizens’ and students’ opinion on topics such as Tawjihi, universities unified admission system, best universities specialties, crisis management and the rule of law, the spread of crime, violence and drugs in Jordan, and daylight saving time and standard time.اضافة اعلان

The poll, which assesses citizens’ knowledge of issues taking place in Jordan and the region, was carried out between September 26 and October 2 on a national sample representing all governorates, regions, age groups, and education levels, as well as on a representative sample of Tawjihi (General Secondary Education Certificate Examination) students, who in the academic year 2021–2022 numbered 186,500, of which 108,500 passed.

Following are the results of the poll:

The majority of Jordanians and the majority of students do not trust the unified admission policies of public universities.

Forty-seven percent of Jordanian students believe that the unified admission system is unfair; a third of Jordanians, 33 percent, hold the same conviction.

Half of Jordanians, 50 percent, do not believe that the Tawjihi exam constitutes a fair evaluation of students’ knowledge, and only 38 percent of Tawjihi students believe that the current Tawjihi system accurately reflects their academic level.

The majority of Jordanians, 61 percent, want to keep the daylight saving time and standard time, 25 percent want to keep the daylight saving time (summer time) throughout the year, and 11 percent of Jordanians want to keep the standard time throughout the year.

Forty-six percent of Jordanian parents whose children sat for the Tawjihi exam described the experience as stressful, 14 percent described it as an emergency situation in the house, 3 percent said it was an exhausting experience, while 26 percent said it was easy.
76% of Jordanians believe that Jordan is a safe country where they and their families feel safe, while more than 38 percent of Jordanians believe that Jordan has become less safe over the past five years
Forty-two percent of the Tawjihi students described the Tawjihi experience as tiring, and 47 percent of Jordanians do not believe that the future of coming generations should depend solely on the results of the Tawjihi exam, and that the exam must be completely reconsidered.

More than a third of Jordanians, 36 percent, and 41 percent of students called for canceling Tawjihi and finding an alternative to it.

More than half of the students, 55 percent, said that they were under psychological pressure during Tawjihi, with 43 percent reporting that this had a negative impact on them.

The majority, 78 percent, resorted to private lessons to sit for Tawjihi; the subjects most studied with private tutors were mathematics, English, physics, chemistry, and Arabic.

Eighteen percent of the students consider obtaining a university degree the most after passing Tawjihi, while 42 percent have getting a job as their goal.

According to the poll, 40 percent of the students believe that they could have obtained a higher average in Tawjihi if they had studied in private schools.

University admission
When filling in the unified admission application, the vast majority of Jordanians, 71 percent, consulted their families and friends on the majors that their children would like to study, and 11 percent resorted to guidance from the Ministry of Higher Education.

At the same time, 35 percent of students said they will sit again for some of the Tawjihi subjects to improve their grades if they cannot register for the major they want to study at the university through the unified admission, 16 percent said they will register in a parallel program at a public university, and 12 percent said they will go to private universities.

In choosing majors while filling in the unified admission application, 34 percent of students took into consideration their Tawjihi average, 23 percent their academic ability, and 23 percent the labor market needs.

According to the poll, students’ choice of universities came in the following order: Jordan University of Science and Technology, followed by the University of Jordan, the Hashemite University, and Yarmouk University.

Among private higher education institutions, Petra University came first, followed by Al-Zaytoonah University, and Philadelphia University.

Medicine, law, dentistry, nursing, English, accounting, and other languages are the disciplines students want to study most, according to the poll.

Regarding crisis management and the rule of law, the poll shows that 76 percent of Jordanians believe that Jordan is a country where they and their families feel safe, while more than 38 percent of Jordanians believe that Jordan has become less safe over the past five years.

The vast majority of Jordanians, 91 percent, believe that social violence is widespread in Jordan; 42 percent attributed it to poverty and unemployment, 19 percent to moral and social transformations that affected customs and traditions, 14 percent to drugs, and 12 percent to the fact that individuals are drifting away from religion.

The majority of Jordanians, 72 percent, believe that weapon possession is rife among citizens in Jordan.

The vast majority of Jordanians, 91 percent, believe that drug abuse and drug trafficking are widespread in the country.

Almost two-thirds of Jordanians, 65 percent, believe that house robbery is widespread in Jordan, while 62 percent believe that stealing cars is widespread in the country.

The majority of Jordanians, 86 percent, believe that murder is widespread in the country.

The poll also shows that the majority of Jordanians, 61 percent, want to have daylight saving time (summer time) and standard time, while 25 percent want the daylight saving time throughout the year, and 11 percent want the standard time throughout the year.


Read more National news
Jordan News