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December 3 2021 2:36 AM ˚
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5 European locations Jordanians can visit this summer

Please note that especially as the Delta variant ramps up, these restrictions are always subject to change. Wherever you decide to travel, make sure you check official government statements for up-to-
Please note that especially as the Delta variant ramps up, these restrictions are always subject to change. Wherever you decide to travel, make sure you check official government statements for up-to-date policies and reach out to the relevant embassy with any questions. (Photo: Unsplash)
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AMMAN — As the summer heats up and Eid Al-Adha approaches, you might be wondering where you can visit under the ever-changing COVID-19 restrictions. Luckily, though some tourist favorites like Italy are still relatively closed to Jordanian travelers, other locations are allowing Jordanians to visit without requiring a lengthy quarantine.اضافة اعلان

No matter where you want to visit, getting vaccinated, by registering on the vaccine.jo platform or, if you’re over 40, visiting one of the open vaccine clinics, will open up the possibilities of foreign travel. And keep in mind that no matter where you go, your vacation might look a little bit different than normal, depending on the social distancing and masking regulations different countries implement.

Please note that especially as the Delta variant ramps up, these restrictions are always subject to change. Wherever you decide to travel, make sure you check official government statements for up-to-date policies and reach out to the relevant embassy with any questions.

 France
France has designated Jordan as an “orange” country, making it relatively straightforward for Jordanians who have taken the COVID-19 vaccine to visit. Jordanians trying to travel after over a year of cabin fever can therefore check out the Eiffel Tower, walk on the Champs-Élysées, and visit other iconic locales with relatively little fuss.



In Paris, cafes like the tourist-favorite de Flore, Wednesday, May 19, 2021, have reopened for outdoor dining. (Photo: NYTimes)

Vaccinated travelers aged eleven and older from Jordan have to take a PCR test taken less than 72 hours before the flight. These travelers must have taken their second dose of the vaccine at least 14 days before the flight.

Unvaccinated travelers, however, can only visit France if they have “pressing grounds for travel.” The French ministry of interior lists all of these possible rationales on its website. They must also present a PCR test and pledge to self-isolate for seven days, and may be subject to random tests once they are in France.

Luckily, there are no restrictions on travel within France itself, so you can tour the country as much as you like. Cinemas, theaters, show venues, indoor and outdoor sports venues, and zoos are allowed to open so long as they stay under 65 percent capacity. Bars and restaurants can reach full capacity outdoors but can only be half full indoors.

You have to wear a mask inside all private venues unless you are eating or drinking.

 Greece
On Sunday, Greece’s civil aviation authority confirmed that Jordan has been added to the list of countries from which visitors do not have to quarantine or present a COVID-19 test to enter. So Jordanians can visit troves of ancient artwork in museums, lay on the beach, or tour historical archaeological sites like the Parthenon.



The port of Naoussa on the Greek island of Paros, June 21, 2021. (Photo: NYTimes)

Visitors from Jordan must, however, present a certificate showing that they have received both doses of the COVID-19 vaccine at least two weeks prior to entering the country.

If you are not vaccinated, not to worry: you can just present a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours from the time of entry.

Once you are in Greece, you will have to wear a mask and abide by social distancing measures in archaeological sites. You can sit outdoors at restaurants, bars, and cafes, but only six people are allowed at each table.

You will also have to abide by a curfew from 1:30am until 5am.

 Malta
Jordan is on Malta’s “amber list,” according to the country’s ministry of health. This means that passengers from the Kingdom have to abide by some regulations, but not all, in order to visit the archipelago.



Tourists visit the Siege Bell Memorial in Valletta, Malta, April 2, 2015. (Photo: NYTimes)

Visitors hoping to visit the island must complete a “Public Health Travel Declaration” and “Passenger Locator Form” and present either a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours prior to arrival or a valid vaccine certificate.

Once you are in Malta, you will want to mask up in all public spaces, outdoors and indoors. Restaurants are open, but only six people are allowed to share one table, and discos and nightclubs are closed.

Typically tourists outnumber locals in Malta three-to-one — meaning that there is a hearty tourist infrastructure to serve your needs while in-country. The archipelago has a number of noteworthy historical sites to pencil into your itinerary, as well as beautiful beaches and island retreats.

 Iceland
If Greece and Malta sound too hot for you this time of year, consider traveling a bit farther north: Iceland has relaxed many of its travel restrictions, making it an accessible and unique travel destination for Jordanians.



The Skogafoss waterfall near Skogar, Iceland, one of the country's most popular sites, but the crowds have vanished during the coronavirus pandemic, on October 10, 2020. (Photo: NYTimes)

Jordanians can visit Iceland with no restrictions, so long as they can present either a COVID-19 vaccination certificate or a certificate attesting that they have already been infected.

If you are not vaccinated, you can still visit so long as you take two PCR tests and quarantine between them. Children born after 2005 are exempt from this restriction.

Additionally, all visitors to Iceland have to pre-register before arrival.

Once you are in the island, your vacation should be fairly similar to pre-pandemic travel: the country has lifted all domestic COVID-19 restrictions. You do not have to wear a mask in public places or abide by social distancing measures.

 Portugal
Jordanians can also visit Portugal with no restrictions.



Beachgoers in Quarteira, a town in the Algarve, Portugal’s leading tourist destination, June 5, 2021. (Photo: NYTimes)

All visitors have to fill a “Passenger Locator Card” before they depart or while on board the flight. You will also have to take a PCR test 72 hours or less before boarding. Children under 12 do not need to show a PCR test.

Within the country, there are still measures intended to stop the spread of COVID-19 in place, such as requirements to wear masks and limited capacity on public transit. Restaurants and cafes close at 1am and cultural facilities and amateur sporting events all have capacity limits.

Certain enterprises have been certified as “clean and safe,” which indicates that they comply with certain health and hygiene standards.

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