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Water minister asks Jordanians not to worry

The minister said on national television that “there is nothing to worry about”, and the government is planning to increase the Kingdom’s water supply using various sources, according to Al-Ghad news.
The minister said on national television that “there is nothing to worry about”, and the government is planning to increase the Kingdom’s water supply using various sources, according to Al-Ghad news. (Photo: Unsplash)
AMMAN — Minister of Water and Irrigation Mohammad Al-Najjar on Saturday stated that, despite less rain and a harsher summer this year, the Kingdom’s water situation is stable.اضافة اعلان

The minister said on national television that “there is nothing to worry about”, and the government is planning to increase the Kingdom’s water supply using various sources, according to Al-Ghad news.  

Towards the end of June, Najjar addressed the issue at a Parliamentary Committee on Agriculture, Water, and Irrigation meeting, explaining that “the dams in the Kingdom are significantly at a lower capacity this year compared to previous years, which affects the quantities of water available for drinking and agricultural purposes."

The Kingdom received less rain than usual during the winter, which is traditionally Jordan’s rainy season.

Najjar also turned to the the Aqaba–Amman Water Desalination and Conveyance Project on Saturday, saying that the project was delayed.

The project was initially proposed during the London Conference in 2019. He said that the project qualified for investments in the private and public sectors on a local and international level in 2020.

Najjar added that the project also received offers from private companies, banks, and other financial institutions to raise its capacity at a cost of JD2.2 billion, contending that the ministry will announce the top five contenders towards the end of July. Companies have until mid-2022 to send their offers, according to Najjar.

The minister also said that 80 percent of Jordan’s water supply depends on groundwater, which is already depleted. The water sector has been utilizing surface water since 1985 and desalinating saline water since 2006. 

Najjar estimated that research surrounding the project will be finished by the end of 2022, and that the project will be fully completed by 2026.

Ministry of Water and Irrigation spokesman, Omar Salameh, previously told Jordan News that the "ministry has expedited the excavation of a number of wells in various areas as well as the hiring of private wells to compensate for shortages.”
Dams across the Kingdom held roughly 146 million cubic meters of water, representing 43.4 percent of their total capacity, by the close of this year's winter season, as previously reported by Jordan News.

The government has called on the public to remain conscious of their water usage and to only use household water for intended purposes.

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