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August 15 2022 3:42 AM ˚
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Tyrian Art Studio: A ‘Second home’ to Jordan’s creatives

Tyrian Art began as a studio for Amman’s artists and creatives. From mid-2019 until early 2021, it was a place where they gathered and collaborated on fun, colorful and as workshops for beginners look
Tyrian Art began as a studio for Amman’s artists and creatives. From mid-2019 until early 2021, it was a place where they gathered and collaborated on fun, colorful and as workshops for beginners looking to hone their artistic skills. (Photo: Handout from Tyrian Art)
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AMMAN — Tyrian Art began as a studio for Amman’s artists and creatives. From mid-2019 until early 2021, it was a place where they gathered and collaborated on fun, colorful and as workshops for beginners looking to hone their artistic skills. اضافة اعلان


(Photo: Handout from Tyrian Art)

“It was a place full of support and appreciation for people who enjoy all art mediums,” Tyrian Art’s executive director, Mutasem Amer, told Jordan News in a recent interview.

“We invited photographers, cinematographers, musicians, and even dancers to (participate in) several projects that aimed to open doors for the talents in Amman,” added Amer.

The space included a drawing area, equipped with brushes, paint, and all the tools required to run Tyrian’s weekly workshops, free-of-charge.


(Photo: Handout from Tyrian Art)

After bearing the brunt of the pandemic, however, Tyrian Art was forced to close its doors, albeit temporarily.

“We couldn't sustain a feasible income to keep the operation running, unfortunately. It was a large space, and we were depending on the support from our fellow artists who were very helpful and supportive of the idea,” said Amer.

News of Tyrian’s closure upset those artists, and many of them offered to help revive it.

“Many artists actually wanted to gather funds and donations,” he said.

To Amer, closing the studio was “not that big of a deal.”

“We loved the place,” he said. “But it was just a small part of the movement we are trying to start. It might sound cliché, but we wanted … to teach people how to love art.”

Amer stated that they aimed to give their members as much artistic content as they could — content that “no other country in the Middle East could provide.”

“We have so much talent here and no one is appreciating, whether it was graffiti, oil paint, murals or digital art, women or men, girls or boys — they're all so talented but no one is willing to pay for their time and talent.”

Amer said that it is depressing for the artists and went as far as stating that “an artist will never make a living from their art in Jordan.”

Saif Fayez, a 21-year-old photographer, thought back to the workshop he ran in September 2019 at Tyrian Art studio, stating it was “a beautiful experience.”

“The workshop was about the basic principles of photography,” he said. “But I chose to do it in a unique way, because … what is most important is that there is no right and wrong in art; If you deliver your message right, then whatever tools you use are right.”

Fayez added that Tyrian Art was very accommodating at the time, providing him with space, PCs, TVs, and equipment to run his workshop smoothly.

“Tyrian was our second home to go work and meet other artists and creatives,” he said.

With plans to reopen in 2022, Tyrian Art is focusing on its social media platforms and website these days.

"Our online platform will be a tool for artists to collaborate, learn new skills, share their stories, and gain recognition. We had to put the operation on hold during the pandemic, and now we have so many ideas we want to implement and several artistic projects in the making,” said Amer. 

“We learned from our mistakes, and we will try our best to give the artistic community the recognition it deserves.” 

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