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July 4 2022 10:02 AM ˚
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Medical tourism plans in place, Libyans may return after debts settled

empty hospital operating theater
(Photo: Envato Elements)
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AMMAN — Minister of Health Feras Al-Hawari said that medical tourism is linked with several official bodies, and that a joint committee has been established to see how to better organize this field, and develop plans and programs to receive tourists from abroad without obstacles.اضافة اعلان

The plans, Hawari said, should enable medical tourists and their companions to visit the tourist and archaeological sites in the Kingdom.

The minister said that meetings are also held to arrange for receiving patients from Libya again, and that the Tunisian Ministry of Health wishes to activate the health protocol with Jordan, with the aim of enabling Tunisian patients to come to Jordan for treatment.

Hawari’s statements were made on Monday during a joint meeting with heads of the health, environment, tourism, and public services committees in the House of Representatives.

Hotel owner Kamal Al-Khreisat told Jordan News that “we are keen to attract tourists from all countries, but the Libyan side’s failure to meet its financial commitments led to a major crisis in the sector”.

He was referring to the Libyan government’s failure to fulfill its obligation and pay for the expenses of its nationals who visited Jordan for medical purposes, debts that have been accumulating for many years, leading some hotel owners to leave Jordan and some to close their facilities.

Operating a hotel comes at a high financial cost that needs a steady financial flow, Khreisat said, and Libyan payments have been delayed for anything from five to 11 years, which made many miss “many investment opportunities in these years”.

Dozens of hotel owners protested Monday in front of the Libyan embassy, asking that the financial dues owed all branches of the tourism sector be settled.

According to hotel owner Taher Al-Rawajfeh, some JD100 to JD120 million is due to the hotels that housed Libyan patients, and the Libyan government has made promises more than 35 times.

Rawajfeh stressed that the hospitality industry is ready to receive medical tourists “provided that obligations are paid first”.

MP Tayseer Krishan told Jordan News that it is not only Libyans who come to Jordan for medical tourism, but citizens from all Arab countries, and that “there is a comprehensive plan for medical tourism in Jordan”.

Krishan said that Hawari and the Libyan ambassador are holding discussions regarding Libya’s obligations to the Kingdom, adding that if Libyans come back for medical tourism, they must do so through the Salamtak platform (www.salamtak.gov.jo), which was created on July 5, 2020, so that payment is guaranteed.

At the same time, Krishan said that the Ministry of Interior may grant five-year visas to medical tourists.

President of the Jordan Hotel Association, Abdul Hakeem Al-Hindi, stressed that “there must be real will to honor previous commitments, “and then we will receive Libyan tourists”.

Jordan News tried to contact the Ministry of Health, but there was no response.


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