September 28 2022 5:44 AM E-paper Subscribe Sign in My Account Sign out

Saving the Amazon Rainforest is entire humanity’s responsibility

Khalid Dalal
Khalid Dalal is a former advisor at the Royal Hashemite Court, a former director of media and communication at the Office of His Majesty King Abdullah, and works currently as a senior advisor for business development at Al-Ghad and Jordan News. (Photo: Jordan News)
For the past few weeks, the world’s attention has been focused on a possible Russia-Ukraine war and for much longer, of course, COVID-19 developments, with little or no thought for many other problems that could seriously affect the life of the globe. One such issue is deforestation in the Amazon, especially on the Brazilian side.اضافة اعلان

War is ugly, and pandemics disrupt life as we know it, so the focus of the international community on such episodes is justified; what cannot be justified, however, is that humanity underestimates the environmental hazards that threaten the entire planet, the habitability of our earth and future generations.

Quoting government data, Reuters recently reported that “Brazil recorded the most deforestation ever in the Amazon Rainforest for the month of January 2022” and that “deforestation in Brazil’s Amazon totalled 430sq.km. last month, five times higher than January 2021”.

Environmentalists blame the ill practice on the Brazilian authorities, which seem to have a problem with environmental protection and cut down tress to have more land to grow coffee and soy and raise beef, to make money. But this bores a hole in a ship that is carrying the entire human race!

There is a good reason why tropical rainforests are considered the “lungs of the planet”. They simply inhale carbon dioxide and exhale oxygen, necessary for living creatures. This situation is changing, however, as the Amazon forest is struggling with the growing CO2 emission, mostly blamed on human activities.

A report in the Guardian in July last year gave unpleasant news, citing scientists confirming, for the first time, that the Amazon Rainforest “is now emitting more carbon dioxide than it is able to absorb”. The newspaper quoted Luciana Gatti, a researcher from the National Institute for Space Research in Brazil, as saying: “The first very bad news is that forest burning produces around three times more CO2 than the forest absorbs. The second bad news is that the places where deforestation is 30 percent or more show carbon emissions 10 times higher than where deforestation is lower than 20 percent.”

In other words, the planet is suffocating and we no longer need wars to kill each other. Unless something is done to offset the overwhelming harmful emissions, the consequences will be dire, and action should be taken now.

The crucial mission ahead is to increase humans’ awareness of the problem, so that each and every one of us realizes that there is a serious problem affecting entire life on this planet, and that the next generation will inherit a worse place than the one we inherited from our ancestors.

... the Amazon Rainforest ‘is now emitting more carbon dioxide than it is able to absorb’.

World leaders and influential powers should act, through the UN, and take binding resolutions to curb human activities that deprive the globe of its precious oxygen, not only in the Amazon forest, but all around the world.

Political differences, economic interests and sometimes ideologies have kept us apart, but now we have something that can unite us, as humans and countries: striving to save our planet.

We can never live happily if Earth is dying; it is bleeding now because of the many sins we commit against nature, and one of them is the deforestation of the Amazon.

An end must be put to such a seriously damaging practice, and it must be done without a second to lose.


The writer is a former advisor at the Royal Hashemite Court, a former director of media and communication at the Office of His Majesty King Abdullah, and works currently as a senior advisor for business development at Al-Ghad and Jordan News.


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