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Head of Anti-Corruption Commission speaks on reform at seminar

commission
The President of the Integrity and Anti-Corruption Commission Mohanad Hijazi speaks at a seminar organized by the Amman Group for Future Dialogues on Saturday, September 4, 2021. (Photo: Handout from the Integrity and Anti-Corruption Commission)
AMMAN— The President of the Integrity and Anti-Corruption Commission Mohanad Hijazi spoke at a seminar organized by the Amman Group for Future Dialogues on Saturday, saying the Government's Royal Message of June 2005 to establish an independent anti-corruption commission affirmed His Majesty King Abdullah’s interest in national reformاضافة اعلان

He added that successive governments did not fail to emphasize the implementation of legislation and procedures that emphasize the prosecution of those found guilty of corruption.

His Majesty had set up a Royal commission at the end of 2012 to promote integrity, whose task was to review legislation, examine the reality of regulatory bodies, and identify their shortcomings.

The King's colloquial papers, especially the sixth paper on the rule of law as the basis of the civil state, where His Majesty has considered the rule of law to be the pillar of the modern civil state, stressed the need to apply standards of integrity and the rules of law as fundamental pillars of prudent governance in order to achieve justice, equality, respect for human rights, and the fight against mediocrity and patronage.

The papers stated that the failure to apply these standards weakens state institutions and undermines citizens' confidence in them.

The head of board of directors added that the fight against corruption has been rooted the Hashemite’s policy approach since the Jordanian Constitution was created in 1952.

He also said that the fight against corruption accompanied the economic movement in the early 1990s and the development of economic and social life in the Kingdom has led to the existence of legislation on crimes against the economy.

He then responded to questions about the work of the commission and the mechanisms for dealing with corruption cases. He commended the cooperation of the judiciary with the commission and the activation of procedures that had helped to speed up the processing of cases, especially after the Judicial Council allocated three bodies to corruption cases and increased the number of prosecutors for corruption cases to eight.


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